Monday, 27 August 2012

David Agenjo


 


This is a really unique artist for me - his work is so different and inspiring, I had to put him on here.
 
David Agenjo is only in his thirties, born in Madrid in 1977. He had a brief career as a graphic designer before teaching himself how to paint in his chosen medium of acrylic. He was determined to refine what skill he had by attending countless life drawing classes, slowly understanding the shapes and lines of the human body, before creating his own renowned works on canvas.
 
Influenced by the diverse nature of colour and texture, he experiments frequently, often using another canvas as his paint palette to create the base of his next painting, creating texture that literally lifts his paintings off the canvas.
 
As you can see below, his works really are beautiful, mixing an array of organic tones with the enchanting architecture of the human body. 








LINKS:

http://www.davidagenjo.com/home_eng.htm
http://www.saatchionline.com/davidagenjo
https://www.facebook.com/David.Agenjo.artist
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Wednesday, 1 August 2012

New Piece

Carrying on with the experimentation, I've decided to take a break from using tea and its monochromatic disadvantage, and instead I have mixed graphite with plain old liquid watercolour. After looking at the work by artists in previous blog posts, I have created this piece (below) with allusions to their techniques, e.g. building layers, wet-in-wet, line and ink etc.

So I began by creating the hand on the left using graphite pencil. I decided that I'd focus highly on tonal work in this hand, then use watercolour for the rest of the image. I had to learn to be patient when building up the layers on the face as I often found myself blotting the colours that blurred into others. After completing the face and hair, I used a black gel pen to create the outline of a shirt.

It got a fair response on my Facebook page, which I'm always so pleased to see!
Hope you like it!


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